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Nutrient Digestibility of Broiler Feeds Containing Different Levels of Variously Processed Rice Bran Stored for Different Periods

by 5m Editor
1 September 2003, at 12:00am

By A. Mujahid, I. ul Haq, A. H. Gilani, Department of Botany, Government College University, M. Asif, National Feeds, and M. Abdullah, Faculty of Animal Husbandry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad.

Nutrient Digestibility of Broiler Feeds Containing Different Levels of Variously Processed Rice Bran Stored for Different Periods - By A. Mujahid, I. ul Haq, A. H. Gilani, Department of Botany, Government College University, M. Asif, National Feeds, and M. Abdullah, Faculty of Animal Husbandry, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad.

Abstract

Nutrient digestibility of broiler feeds containing different levels of variously processed rice bran stored for varying periods was determined. A total of 444 Hubbard male chicks were used to conduct four trials.

Each trial was carried out on 111 chicks to determine digestibility of 36 different feeds. Chicks of 5 wk age were fed feeds containing raw, roasted, and extruded rice bran treated with antioxidant, Bianox Dry (0, 125, 250 g/ton), stored for a periods of 0, 4, 8, and 12 mo and used at levels of 0, 10, 20, and 30% in feeds.

Digestibility coefficients for fat and fiber of feeds were determined. Increasing storage periods of rice bran significantly reduced the fat digestibility of feed, whereas no difference in fiber digestibility was observed.

Processing of rice bran by extrusion cooking significantly increased digestibility of fat even used at higher levels in broiler feeds. Interaction of storage, processing, and levels was significant for fat digestibility.

Treatments of rice bran by different levels of antioxidant had no effect on digestibility of fat and fiber when incorporated in broiler feed.

The study is published in Poultry Science 82:1438-1443, September 2003 edition

Source: Poultry Science - September 2003