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International Egg and Poultry Review

by 5m Editor
25 February 2004, at 12:00am

By the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service - This is a weekly report looking at international developments concerning the poultry industry, this week following the latest news in the World Meat Markets.

International Egg and Poultry Review - By the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service - This is a weekly report looking at international developments concerning the poultry industry, this week following the latest news in the World Meat Markets.

World Meat Markets

Approximately one-third of global meat exports, or 6 million tons, are presently being affected by animal disease outbreaks. This includes meat product exports from nearly 12-13 countries which have been banned or constrained in 2004 as a result of animal disease concerns.

Canada, the U.S., China, Thailand and 8 other Asia countries have reported outbreaks of different strains of avian influenza. These countries account for almost 50 percent of world exports of poultry meat (about 4 million tons).

In the United States and Canada, the identification of BSE-inflected cows led to markets around the world banning product. The US and Canada account for more than one-quarter of global beef export supplies (or 1.6 million tons).

Non-traditional exporters are moving to supply Japanese import poultry demand. Both Malaysia and the Philippines have moved to finalize agreements to export poultry to Japan. Malaysia will export 200 to 240 tons of boneless chicken) while the Philippines are hoping to ship 30,000 tons.

The Japanese are reaching a tentative agreement with Thailand to resume imports of processed/heat treated poultry. Out of the $450 million of Thai poultry exported to Japan last year, approximately one quarter is in processed form. The EU is already taking processed product from Thailand.

Brazilian exporters indicate that stronger demand for Brazilian poultry products in the wake of AI outbreaks would increase 2004 output by 5-6 percent while pushing poultry exports up by 15 percent.

Chinese exports are forecast to decline 20 percent in 2004 in response to AI outbreaks; meanwhile imports are expected to decline even more, down 25 percent due to a slowdown in consumption and poultry product import bans on AI-affected suppliers, including the U.S. As of February 19, China had culled 7,961,400 birds and 10,211,800 had received compulsory vaccinations.

As of February 23, 2004, 29 countries had trade bans on U.S. poultry exports in place or pending. The scope of the bans varies widely by country. Some countries allow product subjected to heat treatment, while some countries even ban poultry bone meal and feather meal. Some restrictions are limited to select states while other countries have a blanket ban on the U.S.

For more information on avian influenza in the United States visit Hot Issues at www.aphis.usda.gov or the Library of Export Requirements at www.fsis.usda.gov to view the most current status.

To view the full report, including tables please click here (PDF Format)

Source: USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service - 24th February 2004

5m Editor