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All Maryland Avian Influenza Test Results Remain Negative

by 5m Editor
18 March 2004, at 12:00am

MARYLAND - The University of Delaware Lasher Laboratory reported that through March 17, all testing of poultry farms within the six-mile zone around the single avian influenza-positive farm near Pocomoke City have tested negative.

All Maryland Avian Influenza Test Results Remain Negative - MARYLAND - The University of Delaware Lasher Laboratory reported that through March 17, all testing of poultry farms within the six-mile zone around the single avian influenza-positive farm near Pocomoke City have tested negative.

These AI-negative test results represent the one-week re-testing of all farms within the six-mile zone. The negative test results indicate that there is no avian influenza present in the 181 poultry houses on 71 farms within the six-mile zone. Re-sampling and testing on these farms will begin again on Monday, March 22 per the surveillance protocol developed by the Delmarva Emergency Poultry Disease Task Force.

As of March 17, a total of 3,575 houses representing 1,482 farms that have been tested for evidence of avian influenza on the Delmarva Peninsula. Since testing began on February 6, 3,570 houses representing 1,479 farms have tested negative for avian influenza.

On March 10, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa confirmed that the strain of virus found in the flock near Pocomoke City, Md. as H7N2, which has not been associated with serious human illness. There is a slight molecular difference between this strain and the Delaware strain. USDA is still conducting its investigation and there is no known connection between the Delaware and Maryland cases. There will be no information on the source of the virus until USDA completes its investigation. The pathogenicity of the virus strain is not yet available.

Avian influenza is an airborne respiratory virus that spreads easily among birds through nasal and eye secretions as well as manure. It can spread rapidly from flock to flock and can be carried across great distances by contaminated vehicles, equipment, and clothing, for example. The H7 strain has not been associated with serious human illness.

Source: Maryland Department of Agriculture - 18th March 2004

5m Editor