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International Egg and Poultry Review

by 5m Editor
28 July 2005, at 12:00am

By the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service - This is a weekly report looking at international developments concerning the poultry industry, this week looking at Avian Influenza across the globe.

International Egg and Poultry Review - By the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service - This is a weekly report looking at international developments concerning the poultry industry, this week looking at Avian Influenza across the globe.

Avian Influenza and the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code

A highly pathogenic form of avian influenza first appeared in Italy around 1878. Sporadic outbreaks have since occurred around the world. In 2003 an outbreak of HPAI in the Netherlands spread to parts of Belgium and Germany and resulted in the loss of more than 28 million poultry, in 2004 Canada lost over 16 million birds in to an outbreak of HPAI, and as of January 2004, FAO estimated that around 20-25 million birds had been culled in Asia. To date, all highly pathogenic isolates have been influenza A viruses of subtypes H5 and H7. At the 73rd General Session of the World Organization for Animal Health held in May 2005, the delegates adopted changes in the obligations of OIE Member Countries to notify avian influenza (“notifiable avian influenza”).

The new definition of notifiable AI (NAI) is defined as an infection of poultry caused by any influenza A virus of the H5 or H7 subtypes or by any AI virus with an intravenous pathogenicity index (IVPI) greater than 1.2 (or as an alternative at least 75% mortality) as described in Chapter 2.7.12 of the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code. NAI viruses can be divided into low-pathogenic notifiable AI (LPNAI) or highly pathogenic notifiable AI (HPAI). The change will come into effect on January 1, 2006.

Another change is the regionalization with specific requirements to declare an area free of NAI. A country, zone or compartment may be considered free from NAI. A compartment means one or more establishments under a common biosecurity management system containing an animal subpopulation with a distinct health status with respect to a specific disease or specific diseases for which required surveillance, control and biosecurity measures have been applied for the purpose of international trade. A zone/region means a clearly defined part of a country containing an animal subpopulation with a distinct health status with respect to a specific disease for which required surveillance, control and biosecurity measures have been applied for the purpose of international trade.
Source: UK Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs, United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code, USDA/AMS

Indonesia

Over nine million chickens have died in Indonesia since the first outbreak in 2003. The disease has been found in 21 out of 30 provinces. Officials used surveillance programs, vaccinated healthy chickens and only culled sick chickens. Pigs have also tested positive for H5N1. After the country’s first human death from H5N1 was confirmed in July 2005, officials announced a decision to cull all chickens and pigs in the affected areas.

The Agriculture Minister said the culling operation would cost up to 800 billion rupees (US 84.2 million), but the department only has 104 billion available and will only cull infected poultry and pigs .
Source: News wires

EU Poultry Situation

Broiler production is forecast to increase in 2005, and slightly in 2006, but at a lower pace than domestic consumption, resulting in an expected increase in imports. Exports are expected to decrease marginally in 2005 and stabilize in 2006.


Turkey production is forecast to increase in 2005 and 2006. The only turkey slaughter plant in Denmark closed operations in April 2004. Turkey imports from Brazil accounted for 85 percent of EU imports in 2004. Imports are expected to increase in 2005 and 2006. Exports are expected to increase slightly in 2005 and 2006.


Poultry production has mostly recovered from the 2003 Avian Influenza outbreak in the Benelux (Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg) or the 2003 nitrofuran scare in Portugal, producers and processors in both the EU-15 and the NMS are still adapting to the new market situation that arose as a result of the 2004 Enlargement process.

Increasing competition in world markets and decreases in EU export refund levels are driving poultry and turkey production down in France and Spain in 2005. In the Benelux, UK and Germany production is increasing, in part due to increased domestic consumption.
Source: USDA/FAS

To view the full report, including tables please click here

Source: USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service - 26th July 2005

5m Editor