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CU Inches Closer to Cage Free Eggs

by 5m Editor
1 November 2007, at 10:53am

COLUMBIA - Between the tote bags and reusable Blue Java mugs, the eggs served in Columbia University’s dining facilities could become the newest target of the University’s “Go Green” initiative. The eco-friendly trend is being further developed through the Certified Humane Cage-Free Eggs Resolution, which was passed by the Columbia College Student Council. It cites general facts about the mistreatment of factory-farmed hens, and urges all Columbia dining establishments to transition to the use of cage-free egg products.

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“Columbia is not the only one looking into the use of cage-free egg products. A good gauge is the other universities who have made the change,”

Alidad Damooei, CC ’09 and vice president of policy for CCSC

If the resolution is turned into a proposal and accepted, the eggs being used in the dining facilities would come from hens who have the ability to walk, nest, and spread their wings inside of barns or warehouses. Although cage-free hens generally do not have access to the outdoors like free-range hens do, they are not forced to live in the overcrowded, 67-square-inch cage that factory-farmed hens are subjected to.

The movement toward the Certified Humane Cage-Free Eggs Resolution began last spring with a petition drive on behalf of Columbia Students for Animal Protection. Hoping to speed up the process, the organization collaborated with CCSC and met with Joseph Heavey from Columbia Housing and Dining before the resolution was passed. Heavey was not available for comment.

“Columbia is not the only one looking into the use of cage-free egg products. A good gauge is the other universities who have made the change,” said Alidad Damooei, CC ’09 and vice president of policy for CCSC. More than 150 colleges and universities, including Harvard and Dartmouth, have transitioned to either partial or complete use of cage-free eggs.

“I think this is something we can do out of good conscience for the student body,” said George Krebs, CC ’09 and the CCSC junior class president.

“Some students feel that the resolution is a good way to continue the green movement on Columbia’s campus. I definitely support this program. My ideology for being a vegetarian in the first place is animal rights. Open-range products would support this, and also be more environmentally friendly,” Alexander Slotnick, CC ’10, said.

Source: ColumbiaSpectator

5m Editor