ShapeShapeauthorShapechevroncrossShapeShapeShapeGrouphamburgerhomeGroupmagnifyShapeShapeShaperssShape

Consumers Turn to Chicken during Economic Crisis

by 5m Editor
18 June 2009, at 9:47a.m.

AUSTRALIA - A recent consumer survey reveals more people are choosing chicken in these cash-strapped times.

It's good news for chicken in the economic downturn, according to a survey conducted by Australian specialty chicken retailer, Lenard's, according to Australia's Food Week.

In a recent survey of nearly 11,000 Australians, over 57 per cent said that they intended to 'save' or 'pay off debts' with their Federal Government Stimulus payment and in keeping with this prudence, they are turning away from 'luxury' meats such as beef, pork and lamb, and putting more chicken on the table as times get tougher.

More than 54 per cent believed chicken is the best value-for-money meat, being eaten at meal times on average 2.3 times a week. Only 25 per cent of respondents believed beef to represent the greatest value.

"This confirms what I've always said that chicken is the better value meat," said Lenard Poulter, Lenard's founder and executive director.

"It's lean, versatile and delicious, and it's great value compared with the more expensive meats."

The research also showed that four in five (82 per cent) surveyed saw beef, lamb and pork products as luxury food items. According to the Meat and Livestock Association's own current research, consumption of these meats has declined in the last quarter of 2008.

Commenting on the results, Mr Poulter told Food Week, "Chicken is low in saturated fat, high in protein and packed with vitamins and minerals, and it's clear that Aussies are starting to get the message that chicken is not only good for your health but also your hip pocket.

"Lenard's has been providing Australian families with a variety of delicious and nutritious products for over 20 years, so we are confident these statistics genuinely reflect the shopping trends we've been observing over the years," he said.

"If customers were to believe the advertising hype, beef and lamb might come out on top, but our survey proves that customers are voting with their dinner plates."