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Government Urged to Consider Poultry Sector

by 5m Editor
11 October 2010, at 9:12a.m.

PAKISTAN - Pakistan Poultry Association (PPA) has urged the government not to bring poultry sector under the proposed Reformed General Sales Tax (RGST) regime, as it is an agro-based industry and providing cheapest meat to the masses.

Business Recorder reports that the association also urged the government to abolish regulatory duty imposed on the import of maize and apply electricity tariff on the poultry farms in line with the agricultural tariff.

The PPA-Northern Zone Chairman Abdul Haye Mehta raised these demand while addressing a press conference in connection with the 'World Egg Day' in Lahore on Friday. Former PPA Central Chairman Abdul Basit, Khalique Arshad and others were also present on this occasion.

'World Egg Day' was observed on Friday to create awareness in the masses about nutritional values of eggs. The Association held a press briefing, a seminar in collaboration with the University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences (UVAS) and others programmes to mark the occasion.

Replying to various questions, Abdul Haye Mehta said the government should patronise this industry, as this sector is one of the most organised branches of the agro-based sector of Pakistan. Poultry, at present contributes 40 per cent of the total meat consumption and generates employment and income for about fifteen hundred thousand people. Poultry is the cheapest available meat protein source for our masses and as such, is an effective check upon the spiralling animal protein prices also, they added.

He said that 25 per cent regulatory duty was imposed on import of maize some one and half year back to stabilise the declining maize prices, but it was not lifted later on. He said that the government should waive off this duty as maize constitutes 60 per cent of the poultry feed. Regarding high prices of poultry meat and eggs, he said that prices go up or down in line with the demand and production of these items.