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Determination of Cooling Rates and Carbon Dioxide Uptake in Eggs

by 5m Editor
4 February 2004, at 12:00am

By P. A. Curtis, Auburn University and K. M. Keener, K. E. Anderson, and J. B. Foegeding, North Carolina State University - The ability to rapidly cool shell eggs to 7°C is important in the prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) growth. In addition, quality may also be maintained longer from rapid cooling of shell eggs.

Determination of Cooling Rates and Carbon Dioxide Uptake in Eggs - By P. A. Curtis, Auburn University and K. M. Keener, K. E. Anderson, and J. B. Foegeding, North Carolina State University - The ability to rapidly cool shell eggs to 7°C is important in the prevention of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) growth. In addition, quality may also be maintained longer from rapid cooling of shell eggs.

Abstract

A commercial cryogenic CO2 egg cooling unit was designed and installed in a commercial egg processing facility. This unit was installed on a packer head to rapidly cool eggs individually prior to packaging. The objective of this study was to determine cooling rates and CO2 gas changes that result from rapidly cooling eggs using this commercial cryogenic egg cooling system and subsequent storage for 15 wk.

Results indicated that cryogenic CO2 cooling quickly cooled shell eggs in approximately 45 min, whereas traditional cooling required from 19 to 116 h. CO2 uptake into the albumen was greater in cryogenically cooled eggs (2.11 mg/g) than in traditionally cooled eggs (1.81 mg/g) immediately after processing.

No differences were observed in albumen CO2 content after 2 wk of storage; at 10 wk statistically greater CO2 content remained in the cryogenically cooled eggs (1.75 mg/g) compared with the traditionally cooled eggs (1.60 mg/g). These results suggest that a large amount of CO2 enters the egg during the cryogenic cooling process but is quickly lost during storage.

Beyond 10 wk of storage, the albumen CO2 content in cryogenically cooled eggs was higher than in the traditionally cooled eggs suggesting chemical changes may have occurred in the albumen.

The study is published in Poultry Science 83:5-14, January 2004 edition

Source: Poultry Science - January 2004