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Effect of replacing whole boiled soya beans with azolla in the diets of growing ducks

by 5m Editor
1 January 2001, at 12:00am

By Maricel Becerra, T R Preston and B Ogle - This article reports on two feeding trials set up to study the effect of feeding Azolla microphylla as partial replacement of the protein in boiled soya bean in diets based on sugar cane juice for meat ducks.

Effect of replacing whole boiled soya beans with azolla in the diets of growing ducks - By Maricel Becerra, T R Preston and B Ogle - This article reports on two feeding trials set up to study the effect of feeding Azolla microphylla as partial replacement of the protein in boiled soya bean in diets based on sugar cane juice for meat ducks.

Abstract:

Two feeding trials were carried out to determine the effect of feeding Azolla microphylla as partial replacement of the protein in boiled soya bean in diets based on sugar cane juice for meat ducks. The experimental design for the trials involved five treatments, four replications (pens) and 10 birds per pen. Diets, containing five levels of crude protein, which were formulated from boiled soya beans and Azolla microphylla and with sugar cane juice ad libitum as the energy source, were fed to 200 growing ducks (Cherry Valley hybrids). The rations were fed from one month of age until the birds reached 60 to 70 days of age, when two ducks (one male and one female) per pen were slaughtered for carcass evaluation.

In the first trial, actual intakes of Azolla were lower than expected, and supplied 15.2, 17.9, 24.4, and 30.3% of the total protein in diets Az15, Az30, Az45, and Az60, respectively. Daily gains (g) were 28.6, 30.4, 28.3, 24.1, and 21.4 for the control, Az15, Az30, Az45, and Az60 diets, respectively and decreased with level of azolla when this exceeded 15% of the dietary protein (P<0.001). Feed conversion ratios deteriorated with increasing consumption of Azolla (P<0.001).

In the second trial, actual intakes of Azolla were also lower than expected, and supplied 14.7, 17.5, 19.2, and 22.6% of the total protein in diets Az15, Az25, Az35, and Az45, respectively. Gains (g/day) were 32.6, 31.5, 30.2, 28.2, and 24.1 for the control, Az15, Az25, Az35, and Az45 diets, with decrease in gain with azolla level beyond15% of the protein (P<0.001). Feed conversion ratios increased with increasing consumption of Azolla (P<0.001). All the carcass traits were similar for all treatments in both trials.

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Source: Livestock Research for Rural Development - Volume 7, Number 3, December 1995

Further Reading

The following feature article is also available on this topics:

Azolla (Azolla pinnata) as a Feed Ingredient in Broiler Ration