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Poultry and Egg Statistics 2005

by 5m Editor
13 March 2006, at 12:00am

By Statistics Canada - This publication provides data on the production, supply and disposition and value of poultry meat and eggs. Also included are data on the average price of eggs sold for table consumption, the per capita disappearance and consumption of poultry meats and eggs, and the production and stocks of processed eggs.

Poultry and Egg Statistics 2005 - By Statistics Canada - This publication provides data on the production, supply and disposition and value of poultry meat and eggs. Also included are data on the average price of eggs sold for table consumption, the per capita disappearance and consumption of poultry meats and eggs, and the production and stocks of processed eggs.

Highlights

Value of poultry production increases
Canadian farmers produced 1.1 million tonnes of poultry meat in 2004, up 1.1% from 2003. Chicken accounts for over 85% of all poultry meat produced. Its production increased 1.7% from year-ago levels. Turkey production stood at 145 thousand tonnes in 2004, a decrease of 2.5% from 2003.

The consumption of poultry has stabilized over recent years, reaching 13.5 kilograms per person in 2004, a slight increase of 1.5% from last year and well above the 11.8 kilograms consumed per person ten years ago. The introduction of varied and readily available easy-to-prepare and ready-to-eat poultry products appeals to the time-conscious consumer and has contributed to poultry’s on-going popularity.

Egg production increases in 2005
Egg production in 2005, at 586.7 million dozen, has increased by 5.9% from 2004. Rebounding from an earlier outbreak of Avian Influenza (AI) in British Columbia, production now stands at an historical high. Annual egg consumption has rebounded in recent years and was pegged at 12.8 dozen per person in 2004, a level similar to 2002 following a slight increase in 2003. Generally, the recent growth can be attributed to publicity outlining the nutritional benefits of eggs, increased use of eggs by the food service sector, the growing popularity of value added products and the expanded use and availability of processed egg products.

Introduction

The data presented are obtained from a variety of sources such as administrative sources and censuses. Administrative data are provided by the Canadian Egg Marketing Agency (CEMA), Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and Statistics Canada. Information from Statistics Canada’s Census of Agriculture and Census of Population is also used in preparing the estimates.

The data, published on a provincial basis, are used in decision making by government agencies, processors, retailers, universities, producer organizations and health institutions.

Statistics Canada has been estimating poultry meat production and value since 1951. Concepts and methods vary over time due to changes in the sector and/or the availability of data sources. Users should note the following:

  1. Production data supplied in table 7 (Supply and disposition of eggs) are compiled in May of each year and revised annually. Production and disposition data supplied in tables 4 and 5 (Production and disposition of eggs) are subject to revision throughout the year and may not compare exactly to the data in table 7;

  2. beginning in 1986, egg consumption is adjusted to take into consideration a loss of 1.95%of total egg production due to leakers and rejects;

  3. also beginning in 1986, a new method is used to calculate consumption on the farm;

  4. a negligible number of hatchery-supply eggs are sold on the table market. Since data on the amount sold are not available, it is deemed to be zero.

The data series are available on CANSIM at the same time as the information appears in The Daily, Statistics Canada’s official release vehicle. CANSIM, Statistics Canada’s computerized database, is an information management system designed to facilitate both historical research and current analysis.

Further Information

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Source: Statistics Canada - March 2006