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The Relationship of Body Composition, Feed Intake, and Metabolic Hormones for Broiler Breeder Females

by 5m Editor
19 June 2006, at 12:00am

By J. M. Sun, M. P. Richards, R. W. Rosebrough, C. M. Ashwell, J. P. McMurtry, and C. N. Coon - Three hundred twenty Cobb 500 broiler breeder pullets at 21 wk of age were selected from a flock fed according to Cobb Breeder Management Guide specifications.

The Relationship of Body Composition, Feed Intake, and Metabolic Hormones for Broiler Breeder Females - By J. M. Sun, M. P. Richards, R. W. Rosebrough, C. M. Ashwell, J. P. McMurtry, and C. N. Coon - Three hundred twenty Cobb 500 broiler breeder pullets at 21 wk of age were selected from a flock fed according to Cobb Breeder Management Guide specifications.

Abstract

One hundred sixty pullets at 21 wk of age were switched to ad libitum feeding, and the remaining 160 pullets continued to be control-fed. The pullets were photostimulated at 22 wk and maintained until 36.5 wk. Plasma samples were obtained, BW was determined, and hens were killed for determination of body composition at the following periods: 24 h prior to photostimulation, 2.5 wk after photostimulation, 24 h after first egg, and 36.5 wk following peak egg production.

Compared with ad libitum-fed breeders, the restricted breeders had a higher percentage carcass protein and lower percentage carcass fat at all sampling periods. Total egg numbers were greater, and abnormal eggs were less for the restricted pullets compared with the ad libitum-fed pullets at 36.5 wk. Carcass percentage fat of ad libitum-fed pullets was positively related to plasma glucagon, insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II), and 17ß-estradiol but negatively related to plasma insulin, insulin/glucagon M ratio, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3).

Carcass percentage fat of feed-restricted pullets was negatively related to IGF-I, IGF-II, and T4. The T4 was the most important hormone for predicting the percentage carcass fat in ad libitum-fed pullets, and IGF-I was the most important hormone for predicting the percentage carcass fat in feed-restricted pullets. The percentage carcass protein for ad libitum-fed breeders was positively correlated to IGF-I, T4, T3, insulin/glucagon M ratio, and insulin.

Carcass percentage protein for feed-restricted breeders was positively correlated to IGF-I, IGF-II, T4, and glucagon. Stepwise regressions for predicting percentage carcass protein for breeders fed by both systems shows that T3 and IGF-I concentrations were the most important for ad libitum-fed breeders, whereas IGF-II and T4 were best for feed-restricted breeders.

The hormone status of breeders may be a key indicator to help predict the body composition and thus support management decisions for maintaining optimum production.

The study is published in Poultry Science, Volume 85, July 2006 edition

Source: Poultry Science - July 2006