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UK Poultry Disease Monthly Surveillance Report (to January 2005)

by 5m Editor
27 January 2005, at 12:00am

By Veterinary Laboratories Agency - This report monitors trends in the major endemic poultry diseases and utilises the farmfile and VIDA (Veterinary Investigation Disease Analysis) databases. The report is compiled using disease data gathered by the network of 15 VLA regional laboratories which carry out disease investigation in the field.

UK Poultry Disease Monthly Surveillance Report - January 2005 - By Veterinary Laboratories Agency - This report monitors trends in the major endemic poultry diseases and utilises the farmfile and VIDA (Veterinary Investigation Disease Analysis) databases. The report is compiled using disease data gathered by the network of 15 VLA regional laboratories which carry out disease investigation in the field.

Monthly Surveillance Report
Published January 2005

Highlights

Avian encephalomyelitis outbreak in 9-day-old broilers

Poultry: Avian encephalomyelitis

Avian encephalomyelitis virus infection (AE) was diagnosed in 9-day-old broiler chicks, submitted with a history of ataxia, opisthotonus, “leg problems, lack of response to antibiotic treatment and affected group mortality (dead and culls) of over 2%. The case was unusual in that the parent flock was 54 weeks old. Most episodes of AE occur when parent flock vaccination has inadvertently been omitted or has been unsuccessful.

IBD

Infectious bursal disease (IBD) was diagnosed in 28-day-old broilers. The flock had been vaccinated at 17 days. The birds were reported to be “not looking good” with some birds lying on their sides.

Wildlife

There were further investigations of cases of salmonellosis in garden birds during the month. The strain typesinvolved were consistent with previous outbreaks. Salmonella typhimurium phage type 40 was isolated from the intestinal tract of a bullfinch from Ironbridge, Shropshire. It had died following an attack by a magpie. Salmonella typhimurium was also isolated from a greenfinch from Rugeley, Staffordshire, a chaffinch from Tarporley, Cheshire and a goldfinch from Crewe, Cheshire.

Post mortem of a sparrow submitted to Sutton Bonington resulted in the isolation of Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 56. Several sparrows in a colony of about 150 had been seen to be apparently ill, being ‘fluffed-up’ and lethargic. There had been occasional deaths. Verbal advice on hygiene aspects and zoonosis aspects together with management of feeders was given.

Salmonella Typhimurium phage type 40 was isolated from the carcase of a male house sparrow submitted by a lady concerned about a sudden increase in mortality in her garden birds. Approximately ten sparrows and six collared doves were reported to have died. The immediate cause of death of the sparrow appeared to be trauma and resultant haemorrhage, however it was postulated that the salmonellosis may result in the birds being easier prey for domestic cats.

To read the full report please click here (PDF)

Source: Veterinary Laboratories Agency - January 2005