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UFU press for fallen stock scheme improvements

by 5m Editor
5 May 2005, at 12:00am

NORTHERN IRELAND - UK farming leaders have met representatives of the National Fallen Stock Company and government to discuss how fallen stock is being collected and disposed of across the UK.

UFU press for fallen stock scheme improvements - NORTHERN IRELAND - UK farming leaders have met representatives of the National Fallen Stock Company and government to discuss how fallen stock is being collected and disposed of across the UK.

With the first lambing and calving season following the introduction of the national collection and disposal scheme virtually finished, discussion centred on experiences of the service over the busy period and identifying the development priorities.

The National Fallen Stock Scheme has been in operation for five months, following the introduction of a ban on the burial of fallen stock in the UK. Farm businesses that sign up to the service can access a 30 per cent discount on collection and disposal costs. In general, the scheme has operated well. The service has made over 100,000 collections across the UK from its 30,000 subscribers. There have been 581 complaints to the Company, concerning mostly localised issues on the reliability of the service.

Attending the meeting in London were NFU Scotland, NFU England and Wales, the Ulster Farmers’ Union and representatives of Defra, the Scottish Executive and the Fallen Stock Company

Speaking after the meeting, Ulster Farmers’ Union President Campbell Tweed said; “What we now need is progress to deliver a more cost effective and user friendly scheme. However following the meeting with the National Fallen Stock Company, I feel they are doing a good job under difficult circumstances, saddled with a very bureaucratic regulation”.

NFU Scotland President John Kinnaird said; “Despite what has sometimes been portrayed as widespread criticism of the collection and disposal service, it is worth noting that members’ complaints have been running at less than two per cent. Having said that, there is no doubt that there is plenty of work ahead to address localised problems where they have occurred”.

“There still remains considerable frustration at the implementation of a burial ban. At best, the benefits of a collection service as an alternative to responsible burial are questionable and, at worst, it actually creates its own animal health and welfare problems. It is important that Government does an impact analysis on the new law and that the practical and financial issues are addressed”.

Source: Ulster Farmers' Union - 4th May 2005

5m Editor