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International Egg and Poultry Review: Turkey Industry in Mexico

by 5m Editor
24 August 2005, at 12:00am

By the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service - This is a weekly report looking at international developments concerning the poultry industry, this week looking at the the Turkey Industry in Mexico.

International Egg and Poultry Review - By the USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service - This is a weekly report looking at international developments concerning the poultry industry, this week looking at the the Turkey Industry in Mexico.

Turkey Industry in Mexico

The domestic turkey industry in Mexico is small. Turkey production in 2004 was only 13,000 metric tons, compared to 2,389,000 metric tons of broilers. Two companies account for almost 90% of turkey production in Mexico and most turkey production is in Chihuahua (40%) and Sonora (50%). About 75% of domestic production is sold as raw whole turkeys for the Christmas season. The balance is sold as domestic turkey parts and further-processed products. Production is expected to remain flat, at 13,000 MT for 2005 and 2006.


Per capita consumption is increasing due to a growing demand for processed turkey products, such as turkey patties, nuggets, cold cuts, oven-cooked turkey legs and the use of turkey in blended pork and turkey hams. Flat production and rising per capita consumption will result in an increased demand for imports.


Source: USDA/FAS

Update on Avian Influenza

Russia lifted the quarantine from twelve settlements in Siberia as the spread of high path avian influenza slowed. Since it was first detected in July, about 11,000 birds have died of disease and an additional 127,000 birds have been slaughtered.

After one village in Kazakhstan confirmed an outbreak of avian influenza, the virus spread to seven northern Kazakh villages. At least 9,000 birds have died or been destroyed since the first case was reported in July. No new cases have been reported since August 15, but quarantines will be kept in place until October.

Tests on dead wild birds in Mongolia identified H5N1 in one dead whooper swan out of 100 birds tested. Samples from 140 live birds from the same site tested negative. In Europe, the Dutch agriculture ministry ordered all commercial poultry farmers with free-range birds to bring their flocks indoors effective August 22, 2005 to avoid exposure to avian influenza through wild birds. About 5.5 million birds out of a national flock of 105 million, or 5 percent, are effected.

Germany would require farmers to bring their free-range birds indoors in mid-September if the disease spreads into Europe. The United Kingdom had no plans to ban keeping fowl outdoors. In the UK’s laying flock of 30 million, about 33 percent are free-range. About 2 to 3 percent of the 150 million broiler chickens are raised outdoors. Representatives of EU member countries' veterinary services will meet in Brussels on August 25 to discuss the situation.
Source: news wires

To view the full report, including tables please click here

Source: USDA's Agricultural Marketing Service - 23rd August 2005

5m Editor