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U.S. poultry exports expected to drop

by 5m Editor
11 March 2006, at 12:00am

U.S. - Worries about bird flu have dampened trade prospects for U.S. poultry, which already is facing lower prices, the Agriculture Department said Friday. The United States should export 5.3 billion pounds of poultry this year, the department said in its monthly crop report. That&#39;s a drop of 95 million pounds from last month&#39;s projections. Companies, not farmers, are feeling pressured. Chicken and turkey farmers generally get steady prices from chicken companies. Bird flu &quot;is having a negative effect on international demand,&quot; John Tyson, chairman and CEO of Tyson Foods Inc., said last month in remarks to the Consumer Analyst Group of New York. Arkansas-based Tyson has more than one-quarter of the nation&#39;s poultry market. Prices for leg quarters, the chief product sold overseas, have plummeted from 40 to 50 cents a pound last fall to around 15 cents, Tyson said. &quot;Long-term, those issues will subside,&quot; Tyson said. &quot;But it&#39;s still going to be tough short-term.&quot; The Agriculture Department&#39;s top economist downplayed the drop in the export forecast. The decline was &quot;fairly modest,&quot; chief economist Keith Collins said Friday. &quot;We&#39;re still expecting poultry exports year-over-year to go up,&quot; Collins said in a statement. &quot;Our major poultry export markets are places like Russia and Mexico and China, and they continue to buy from us.&quot; Indeed, last year&#39;s poultry exports were 5.14 billion pounds, lower than the 2006 forecast. Despite fears of bird flu, demand by U.S. consumers should stay strong, the department said. The average person is expected to eat 87.7 pounds of chicken this year, up from a forecast of 87.2 pounds last month. U.S. residents ate an average of 85.8 pounds of chicken last year, the department said. The industry is keeping an eye on consumer confidence, said Richard Lobb, spokesman for the National Chicken Council. <i>Source: Modbee.com</i>

5m Editor