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Intervet develops prototype for mass application avian influenza vaccine

by 5m Editor
14 June 2006, at 12:00am

THE NETHERLANDS - A biotech breakthrough achieved by Akzo Nobel’s animal health business, Intervet, means that mass application of a dual vaccine against avian influenza and Newcastle Disease could be available in the near future.

Intervet develops prototype for mass application avian influenza vaccine - THE NETHERLANDS - A biotech breakthrough achieved by Akzo Nobel’s animal health business, Intervet, means that mass application of a dual vaccine against avian influenza and Newcastle Disease could be available in the near future.
Intervet Poultry

Together with scientists at the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institute (FLI) in Germany, Intervet has developed a prototype for a new generation vaccine offering protection against both infections which can be mass applied by spraying instead of injecting.

The new prototype vaccine consists of a safe live vaccine against Newcastle Disease (a condition affecting many bird species), which acts as a carrier for the haemagglutinin gene—the vital genetic material needed to build immunity against the avian influenza virus.

“This is a significant scientific development which underlines Intervet’s innovative power and the company’s commitment to strengthen its position as the world leader in animal vaccines,” said Toon Wilderbeek, member of Akzo Nobel’s Board of Management, responsible for Pharma. “The prototype combines the efficacy of the present vaccines with a mass application tool and could prove invaluable in helping to quickly protect large numbers of birds, which currently have to be injected individually.”

The new vaccine—which is scheduled to undergo field trials next year—can also be used on large numbers of birds as an efficient marker vaccine to help differentiate between infected and vaccinated birds.

Intervet and FLI have been working together on Newcastle Disease Virus reverse genetics since 1998. The collaborative work has led to the development of prototype vaccines and the publication of several articles in peer-reviewed journals. The FLI has also issued an announcement on this important veterinarian breakthrough.

Source: Intervet - 12th June 2006

5m Editor