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Legislation Needed To Protect Farmers, Farmland

by 5m Editor
13 August 2007, at 10:58am

US - Just as Steam Mill and Sheffield Mills no longer have water-driven milling operations and boats can't be moored in Port Williams, is it possible that some day there won't be any great meadows left in Grand Pre? The tractors rumbling through Kentville last week got a lot of folks thinking.

Talking with Kings County Warden Fred Whalen the day after he voted for a subdivision in Weston, I could tell he feels as torn as many. A strong advocate of buying local, the warden also saw an economic benefit to the Weston project since he says this county has 5,000 acres of unused agricultural land.

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“Many have the attitude toward development that we once had toward smoking: sure it's bad, but it won't be a problem for me.”

Fred Whalen, Kings County Warden

American columnist Anna Quindlen says, “Many have the attitude toward development that we once had toward smoking: sure it's bad, but it won't be a problem for me.” In the eastern Valley these days, people are butting up against a problem with development.

This region, Niagara and the Okanogan boast the three most fertile soils in Canada. Obviously this productive land is a finite and irreplaceable resource. But how do you tell that to farmers who can't make a living raising hogs or chicken?

Approximately half of the two billion acres of land in the United States is working agricultural land, but estimates suggest that every minute of every day they lose two acres of agricultural land to development. Farmland is desirable for building because it tends to be flat, well drained and affordable. Hereabouts, we have a bizarre case of rural beauty drawing city people and retirees to clog the bucolic countryside that attracted them in the first place.

Voluntary Purchase of Development Rights programs have been gaining in interest in the U.S. in recent years. Under the program, landowners voluntarily sell their development rights for the difference between the value of the land if it was sold to a developer and its value as farmland.

Source: NovaNewsNow

5m Editor