ShapeShapeauthorShapechevroncrossShapeShapeShapeGrouphamburgerhomeGroupmagnifyShapeShapeShaperssShape

Indiana Recognizes Outstanding Producers

by 5m Editor
10 January 2008, at 1:13pm

US - The Indiana State Department of Agriculture (ISDA) is currently developing a Certified Livestock Producer Program (CLPP) as a way to recognize livestock producers that go above and beyond in their farm practices and procedures.

This voluntary program will recognize producers that are willing to demonstrate publicly their commitment to the environment, animal well-being, food safety, emergency planning, biosecurity and being a good neighbor in their community. ISDA believes this tool will help improve understanding of modern livestock production in today’s communities.

The program was developed with advice and input from a broad range of stakeholders. A 19-member advisory board was created with representatives from the following areas: livestock and poultry producers, local officials, environmental organizations, universities, state agencies, processors, retailers and banking. The advisory board played a critical role in developing objectives, goals and outcomes for the program. Research and review of other states programs also aided in development.

After several months of advisory board meetings, a draft program has been developed that identifies a comprehensive set of performance standards that reflect excellence in livestock production. The next step in the process is to gather input from the general public through listening sessions across the state. ISDA will consider public comments received prior to making their final recommendation on the program to the advisory board. A pilot phase on the program will be conducted in early 2008. An assessment of the pilot phase will take place before statewide launch.

A statement from the report reads - "We encourage all species of livestock and poultry of any size operation to apply to the program. Upon receiving the initial application, ISDA will verify a series of regulatory compliance checks."

After this verification, the applicant must complete the following requirements:
  • Producer promise
    The producer will sign as a professional promise of ethics, values, trust, respect, integrity, performance excellence and accountability."

  • Environment section An educational section includes a regulatory guidance document and a resource guide. The producer conducts a self assessment where he or she must receive a minimum score for above and beyond environmental practices in areas such as nutrient management, manure handling and conservation practices.

  • Food safety/animal well-being section
    The producer must complete a nationally-recognized certification program for their respective species that addresses food safety and animal health, care and housing. This section is validated by a veterinarian or technical specialist.

  • Emergency plan section
    Standards to be included in an emergency plan are set forth in the education section. A producer conducts a self-assessment and must obtain a minimum score to verify they have developed and implemented a plan for their farm that meets these standards. A local fire department representative reviews and validates the plan.

  • Biosecurity section
    The education section describes the eight criteria for a biosecurity plan. A producer must conduct a self-assessment and obtain a minimum score to verify they have developed and implemented a biosecurity plan that meets these criteria. They must meet with a veterinarian to review and validate the plan.

  • Good neighbor section
    A letter is sent to neighbors informing them that the producer is seeking to be certified and explains the certification process. Guidelines on building good neighbor relations are included in the educational section. The producer must demonstrate actions as a good neighbor through the self assessment and attainment of a minimum score.

The CLPP program says it will strive to keep certified producers up-to-date on new technologies, research, regulations and management practices. To maintain certification the producer will have to complete nine hours of continuing education over a three-year period.

The producer must complete a nationally-recognized certification program for their respective species that addresses food safety and animal health, care and housing. This section is validated by a veterinarian or technical specialist.

Further Reading

- You can view the details of this program by clicking here.

5m Editor