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Hillandale Farms Resumes Trading

by 5m Editor
19 October 2010, at 10:47am

US - The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorised one of the farms at the centre of the recent Salmonella egg recalls to resume selling eggs from some of its layer houses, but it has sent a warning letter to the other egg producer.

FDA authorises Hillandale Farms to begin shipping fresh shell eggs

FDA has released a redacted copy of a letter sent to Hillandale Farms of Hampton, Iowa, dated 15 October 2010. Hillandale Farms is one of two companies that recalled eggs in August 2010. This letter authorises Hillandale Farms to ship eggs to the table market from three of its egg-producing houses.

FDA's decision is based upon a thorough review of the company's response to the inspection observations noted by the agency in August. In addition, the three houses have been extensively tested and found to have no evidence of Salmonella contamination. Four other houses overseen by Hillandale are undergoing further testing before consideration for shipping. Hillandale Farms has also committed to an enhanced surveillance programme for Salmonella.

Hillandale Farms notified FDA that the company intends to begin shipping from the three houses on 18 October 2010.

FDA issues warning letter to Wright County Egg

FDA has released a redacted copy of a warning letter sent on 15 October 2010 to Austin J. DeCoster, owner of Quality Egg LLC of Galt, Iowa. Quality Egg LLC is one of two companies that recalled eggs in August 2010. Quality Egg LLC has not shipped eggs to the table market since the August recalls.

The warning letter identifies serious deviations from FDA's regulation on the safety of shell eggs with respect to biosecurity, rodent control and other measures. The letter also finds that the eggs at Quality Egg LLC are adulterated because they have been prepared, packed, or held under insanitary conditions.

The letter states: 'Failure to take prompt corrective action may result in regulatory action being initiated by the Food and Drug Administration without further notice. These actions include, but are not limited to, seizure and/or injunction.'