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Mexico Confirms 28 High-Path Bird Flu Outbreaks

13 July 2012, at 11:42pm

MEXICO - There have been 28 confirmed outbreaks of H7N3 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in the central state of Jalisco between 29 June and 10 July.

The Mexican veterinary authority sent Follow Up Report No. 3 dated 10 July to the Worlkd Organisation for Animal Health (OIE).

All the outbreaks were on poultry farms in the state of Jalisco. In total, more than eight million birds were involved, of which more than two million showed symptoms and 784,639 died.

The source of the outbreak(s) or origin of infection are unknown or inconclusive.

According to the epidemiological comments in the report, during the epidemiological surveillance carried out in response to the event, the National Food Quality, Food Safety and Health Service (SENASICA) has taken samples in the outbreaks and around the outbreaks in 148 poultry farms. Of these, 31 farms were identified by viral isolation, diagnosis is ongoing in other 83 and 34 have tested negative to H7N3 highly pathogenic virus. The population at risk in these 148 farms amounts to about 17 million birds, of which 86.1 per cent of layers, 6.9 per cent of broilers and seven per cent of breeders.

As part of the measures taken to reduce the risk, the buffer zone has been extended to 60km around the index outbreak and includes 161 poultry farms at risk with a population of 25.8 million of birds. Control measures on birds and their products movements have been strengthened in the quarantine area and eight check points have been established with the support of 26 health technicians with nine vehicles that monitor the quarantine zone.

Epidemiological surveillance activities continue in the outbreaks, around the outbreaks and in the buffer zone. As a measure to reduce the risk, sampling will be carried out in neighbouring States and in poultry farms at risk outside the buffer zone.

Further Reading

You can visit the Avian Flu page by clicking here.