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Imported food must meet the high standards of British production

4 March 2019, at 12:00a.m.

UK - The British Poultry Council is calling for a Government-wide commitment that production standards of imported food will have to meet British standards as a condition of entry.

The US outlined its objectives for a post-Brexit trade deal with the UK, demanding greater access to the food markets where products such as chlorinated chicken are banned under EU rules.

British Poultry Council, Chief Executive, Richard Griffiths, said:

“British farmers have worked incredibly hard to build a food system that enhances British food values and that ensures high standards of production from farm to fork. We cannot afford to lower our food standards in pursuit of trade deals.

"Britons demand safe, wholesome, and nutritious food; world-class animal welfare; production that respects the environment; food that is affordable and available; and a sustainable and secure supply chain. Our trading partners must respect that.

"It is insulting of the US to offer trade products that do not meet our high standards of food production. British food producers don’t dip their chicken carcase in chlorine as we do not believe in ‘cleaning up at the end’ or taking any short-cuts when it comes to producing food to high standards. Using chemicals to disinfect food at the end of a production process can hide a multitude of sins, but what it can't hide is the need for their use in the first place.

"We are calling for a Government-wide commitment that production standards of imported food will have to meet British standards as a condition of entry. This would allow for fair competition, healthy trade (which is essential for carcase balance) and ensure food standards that British people can be proud of.

"We mustn’t compete in a race to the bottom or compromise on our high standards of production in pursuit of new trade deals.”

Editor at The Poultry Site

Ryan worked in conservation from 2007-2017, during which time he operated a rainbow trout hatchery in Canada for the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority. As editor of The Poultry Site, he now writes about challenges and opportunities in the global poultry industry and agri-food chain.

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